Food insecurity in Henderson County

Food insecurity is particularly troublesome for children who do not have the power or the means to take care of themselves and who must depend on the adults in their lives to do so. NC Child reports that in 2015, “more than 1 in 6 U.S. children (18 percent) lived in households that were food-insecure at some point during the year, and 0.7 percent experienced the most severe level of need, where food intake is reduced and regular eating patterns are disrupted.” The term “food-insecure” is used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to refer to the “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways.” Continue...

Standing in the gap for children

When you walk into the Henderson County Guardian ad Litem office, you’ll see two walls. One has hearts with the names of children who have been removed from their home due to abuse, neglect or parental dependency (substance abuse), and whose future will be determined by the courts. The other has hands with the names of volunteers who stand in the gap for these children, representing them in court and speaking for them because they cannot speak for themselves. Right now, there are 30 young hearts in need of a hand. Continue...

Health care for kids is a priority

In 2007, our community gathered to set priorities for children who live and grow up in our town. We were challenged to think of doable, local solutions to our children’s greatest needs. Our top priority was to increase the number of school nurses, creating better health care access. Not having nurses on-site at each school means school employees often provide medical interventions for children with chronic illnesses or injuries. Our commissioners made it a priority to add school nurses until our nationally recommended ratio of one nurse for every 750 students is met.  Continue reading…...

Different skills for different stages

There’s nothing quite like that moment I first see “my mountains” when I’ve been traveling and I’m driving home. I come around a curve or crest a hill, and there they are — breathtaking. I always think in awe and gratitude, “I get to live here.” I just spent a week in Florida at my daughter’s college orientation. It was miserably hot. It’s no wonder Floridians move here. On my last day, it was already a sticky 78 degrees at 7:30 a.m. My air conditioning seemed to never catch up. When I made it home, I opened my car door and my wonderful mountains greeted me with a cool evening breeze and the ability to take a deep breath. Continue reading…...

Child welfare reform on horizon

I recently became aware that the federal government did a review of North Carolina’s child welfare system.  They looked at seven child welfare outcomes and seven systemic factors.  Our state system failed in all 14 areas. Continue reading…  ...

Aiding Transition to Adulthood

The Children & Family Resource Center will celebrate as 20 teen parents, who have been in our Adolescent Parenting Program, walk across the stage to receive their diplomas. This is our largest ever graduating class. Graduation day is a significant achievement for every student, and given the obstacles some of these teens have had to overcome, we are particularly proud. Continue...