Strong families boost community

The Children & Family Resource Center is all about families. Not only the families we have the privilege of serving, but our own family of staff members, volunteers, board members and donors. Sadly, this year we’ve lost several special members of the Children & Family Resource Center’s family: Bob Kemp, Carola Cohn, Vivian Hoeppner, Christine Folwell and Terry Hicks. One was a former staff member. All were donors, and all were special to us in their own ways. Most certainly, all played a part in our history and, like a family should do, they believed in us and supported us in our important milestones. continue...

Knowledge, wisdom aren’t the same

I learned something recently that surprised me. In Europe, children as young as 5 years old are learning how to program computers when they start school. I live and breathe early childhood at work, and somehow this was news to me. These efforts are aimed at giving children knowledge — skills they will need to be employable in the workforce of the future. Some economists and educators believe that European countries are ahead of the game when compared to the U.S. Continue...

Food insecurity in Henderson County

Food insecurity is particularly troublesome for children who do not have the power or the means to take care of themselves and who must depend on the adults in their lives to do so. NC Child reports that in 2015, “more than 1 in 6 U.S. children (18 percent) lived in households that were food-insecure at some point during the year, and 0.7 percent experienced the most severe level of need, where food intake is reduced and regular eating patterns are disrupted.” The term “food-insecure” is used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to refer to the “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways.” Continue...

Standing in the gap for children

When you walk into the Henderson County Guardian ad Litem office, you’ll see two walls. One has hearts with the names of children who have been removed from their home due to abuse, neglect or parental dependency (substance abuse), and whose future will be determined by the courts. The other has hands with the names of volunteers who stand in the gap for these children, representing them in court and speaking for them because they cannot speak for themselves. Right now, there are 30 young hearts in need of a hand. Continue...

Health care for kids is a priority

In 2007, our community gathered to set priorities for children who live and grow up in our town. We were challenged to think of doable, local solutions to our children’s greatest needs. Our top priority was to increase the number of school nurses, creating better health care access. Not having nurses on-site at each school means school employees often provide medical interventions for children with chronic illnesses or injuries. Our commissioners made it a priority to add school nurses until our nationally recommended ratio of one nurse for every 750 students is met.  Continue reading…...